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Yes, if you have eligible children, they will receive compensation until they are no longer eligible.

An eligible child is a child who is your biological child (born or unborn at the date of your death), an adopted child, or child who was financially dependent upon you at the time of your death. And who is:

  • under 18, or
  • over 18 and under 23 and in qualifying education, or
  • over 18 and under 23 and has a qualifying disability.

If you die before your former pension scheme enters PPF assessment survivor provisions may differ.

This depends on the rules of your former pension scheme - if your spouse/civil partner or relevant partner would have received compensation under those rules then they'll be eligible to receive survivor's compensation from us. We will ask the person dealing with your estate for contact details of a spouse/relevant partner where one would be eligible.

If you live with an unmarried partner and  your former pension scheme rules allowed for a partner to receive a survivor's pension after your death, you may nominate your partner to receive survivor's compensation in the event of your death.

We refer to such individuals in our letters and booklets as 'relevant partners'.

Nomination forms are intended for use where you wish to inform us of a partner of either sex whom you aren't married to, or in a civil partnership with, but who you live with as if you are married or in a civil partnership.

We refer to such individuals in our letters and booklets as 'relevant partners'.

You can nominate your 'relevant partner' by completing one of our Nomination of Beneficiary forms, which can be done either on our member website (if you have registered) or by contacting us to request a form be sent to you by post.

However, you don't need to complete a nomination form if you are married/in a civil partnership. You also don't need to nominate any children. We will enquire about these individuals as part of the bereavement process.

Nominating partners can be important. For instance, if you separated from your spouse but never got divorced and you had not nominated your new partner, compensation would automatically be paid to the spouse (and not your relevant partner) on your death.

It also means the partner has to provide less documentary proof on your death for us to confirm their eligibility for survivor's compensation.

We may still pay compensation to your partner even if you haven’t nominated them. But in addition to providing us with evidence that they were living with you at the time of your death, they’ll then have to demonstrate that you were either financially dependent on each other or that they were financially dependent on you.

Please note, we refer to such individuals in our letters and booklets as 'relevant partners'.

You only need to fill out a nomination form if you wish to nominate a relevant partner who is not your spouse or civil partner.

A relevant partner is someone you are not married to but who you live with as if you are married.


No. We only need to see a copy of the original certificate.

An eligible child is one who is your biological child (born or unborn at the date of your death), an adopted child, or child who was financially dependent upon you at the time of your death and who is:
•under 18, or
•over 18 and under 23 and in qualifying education, or
•over 18 and under 23 and has a qualifying disability.

If you die before your former pension scheme enters PPF assessment survivor provisions may differ.

Once we receive the completed beneficiaries’ claim form together with any relevant documents requested on the form, we will make monthly payments in advance to the survivor’s (s’) bank account (s).


Compensation is payable for life.

If you die after you have retired, an eligible spouse, civil partner or relevant partner will receive half the annual compensation you would be receiving at your date of death.

If you die before you retire and before you have reached the normal pension age of your former scheme, an eligible spouse, civil partner or relevant partner may receive half the compensation you would have received had you reached normal pension age immediately before you died. This means the compensation would be revalued to the day before death and no early retirement reduction would be applied.

If you die before you retire and after you have reached the normal pension age of your former scheme, an eligible spouse, civil partner or relevant partner may receive half the compensation you would have received had you retired immediately before you died.

A relevant partner is someone you are not married to but who you live with as if you are married.

The amount of compensation a member’s children will receive will depend on whether a spouse, civil partner or relevant partner will also receive compensation following the member’s death.

Where compensation is being paid to a spouse, civil partner or relevant partner, the following compensation will be paid to the member’s children:

  • one child – 25 per cent of the member’s compensation
  • two or more children – 50 per cent of the member’s compensation, divided equally.

Where compensation is not being paid to a spouse, civil partner or relevant partner, the following compensation will be paid:

  • one child – 50 per cent of the member’s compensation
  • two or more children – 100 per cent of the member’s compensation, divided equally.

Payments will be made into a bank account in the name of the relevant child.

When a child is no longer eligible for compensation, we will stop making payments to them.
But, if there are other children who are still eligible, the amount of compensation they receive will be recalculated in line with the criteria above.

If you have nominated your partner to receive your compensation (and your former pension scheme allowed for a survivor’s pension to be paid to a relevant partner) he/she will receive the survivor’s compensation. We will need you to complete a nomination form even if you previously completed one for your former pension scheme.

If you have not nominated your partner, your former spouse will receive the compensation if we become aware of them.

In all cases we will need to see a copy of a death certificate.
Other documents may be needed, depending on your personal circumstances such as a:

  • Marriage certificate
  • Civil registration
  • Decree absolute
  • Dissolution certificate
  • Child(ren)’s birth certificate(s)
  • Amended birth certificates issued on adoption.

Where the deceased had a relevant partner, additional documents may be needed.

A relevant partner is someone you’re not married to but who you live with as if you’re married.

If you have a surviving spouse or civil partner, and the terms of your former scheme allow for them to receive a pension when you die, they will receive compensation payments, regardless of whether you have filled in a nomination form or not.

However if you do leave a relevant partner, who is not a spouse or civil partner, in order to receive compensation your partner will need to provide evidence that they were financially dependent on you or that you were mutually financially dependent.

Also, if you leave a spouse or civil partner from a previous relationship, and have not divorced or dissolved the partnership, then it is your spouse or civil partner that will be entitled to receive compensation.

In either event, regardless of whether you have filled in the nomination form, your relevant partner will need to provide evidence that they were living with you at the time of your death.


We will stop paying compensation to a child when they reach the age of 18 unless they are in qualifying education or have a qualifying disability. No compensation will be paid after the age of 23.

If a child is 18 or over and takes any break from full time education, their compensation will stop. However if they re-enter full-time education within 12 months, their compensation payments could be resumed if they let us know.

If your child stops their studies, they will lose their right to compensation. But, if they resume their studies on another course within 12 months, they can ask for their compensation to be paid again.

Up to the age of 23, children will receive compensation if they cannot undertake full-time paid employment due to a disability which is covered by the Equality Act 2010.

Once we have been told of your death we will stop further payments immediately. As we pay compensation monthly in advance, a delay in telling us may lead to an overpayment, which will have to be paid back to us from your estate.

A relevant partner is someone of either sex who you aren't married to, or in a civil partnership with, but whom you live with as if you are married or in a civil partnership.


Yes, just before a child turns 18 they will be told that their compensation payments will stop on their 18th birthday. If they remain eligible after this time because they are in qualifying education or have a qualifying disability, they will be asked to send evidence to show that they are still eligible. They will need to confirm eligibility each year until they no longer qualify.
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